Archive for the Church Category

The Axehead Falls

Posted in Christian Music, Christianity, Church, Discipleship, Evangelism, God, Jesus, Megachurch, Religion on December 2, 2008 by Scott

What better way for the Axe to fall than to say goodbye with our friends from Audio Adrenaline.

No tears. It’s simply time to shut-up and start making a difference somewhere. But we’re not disappearing completely.  You can find us on Twitter and Facebook

In the words of Forest Gump, “That’s all I’ve got to say about that.”

How to Save a Life

Posted in Church, God, Jesus, Religion on December 1, 2008 by Scott

how_to_save_a_lifeDo you want to save someone’s life…literally?  Invite them to church.

A study by researchers at Yeshiva University and its medical, the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, found that attending religious services may significantly reduce the risk of death.

The study found that those who attend religious services at least once a week showed a 20% decrease in the overall risk of mortality than those attending no services at all.

Lost on the researchers is the irony that by helping someone find “life,” you can save them from a sure death.

When No One is Watching

Posted in Christianity, Church, Faith, God, Jesus, Religion on November 24, 2008 by Scott

watchingThey say the test of character is who you are when no one is watching.

PGA golfer JP Hayes proves that there is still honesty and integrity in sports.

During the second stage of the PGA Tour qualifying tournament last week, Hayes discovered that he had unwittingly used a prototype golf ball not approved by the United States Golf Association.

No one would have known. But Hayes, honoring the tradition of a game where the players police themselves, turned himself in and was disqualified.

On his 12th hole of the first round, Hayes’ caddie reached into his golf bag and tossed a ball to Hayes, who played two shots — a tee and a chip onto the green — and marked his ball. At that point he realized the ball he was playing was not the same model with which he started the round — by rule, a two-stroke penalty.

“I realized there was a penalty and I called an official over,” Hayes said, according to the newspaper. “He said the penalty was two shots and that I had to finish the hole with that ball and then change back to the original ball.”

On Thursday night, Hayes realized that the errant golf ball might not have been on the approved list.

Hayes had a choice: He could have said nothing and kept playing, with no one aware of his mistake. Or he could turn himself in and let his mistake cost him a 2009 PGA Tour card. He chose the latter.

Hayes, 43, is refusing to blame his caddie for the error, saying he should have spotted the errant ball because it did not have a model name on the seam.

Had Hayes kept the error to himself he likely would have gained millions…at least hundreds of thousands.  His take on the error?  Now he can spend more time with his family.

Wouldn’t it be great if instead of being known for being against things we stood for honesty, integrity, character, personal accountability, love and caring about others more than ourselves?

What if we realized that there is one who is always watching? Maybe then we would behave differently.

Fanatics

Posted in Christianity, Church, Evangelism, Faith, God, Jesus, Religion on November 23, 2008 by Scott

How about this?  85,000+ fanatics screaming and jumping as the Sooners beat Texas Tech.

Imagine if we got that excited about spreading the Gospel, serving others, and following God.  What kind of difference could we make then?

The Church of Starbucks

Posted in Christianity, Church, God, Megachurch, Religion on November 20, 2008 by Scott

A couple of years ago many churches were looking to emulate the Starbucks culture and retail atmosphere.

Turning the tables, Beyond Relevance shared this great video that shows what might happen if Starbucks decided to emulate a church.

I loved the locked doors, the greeters standing around talking to each other, and the first time visitors.  And what about the lesson on giving? Classic.

Coffee is good – all the time…and all the time – coffee is good!

This would be funnier if there wasn’t some truth to it.

Really, Really Long Prayer Guy

Posted in Christianity, Church, God, Prayer, Religion on November 18, 2008 by Scott

Every church has one.  If you don’t think so, look in the mirror.

Who’s Fault Is It?

Posted in Christianity, Church, Culture, Discipleship, Evangelism, Faith, God, Jesus, Missional, Politics, Religion on November 12, 2008 by Scott

blameNo…not the election.

Who’s fault is it that we have become reliant on the government to solve our societal issues?

Christians have become a pawn in the political process and we allowed it to happen.

Meanwhile, our society is full of people who need help – the homeless, young women considering abortion, kids who are starving, families breaking apart, and more.

And where are we?  Canvassing for our favorite politician so that they can cure everything that is “wrong” in our country.

Pastor Greg Matte of Houston’s First Baptist Church puts it this way:

…government policy has stepped into theology. The beginning of life and definition of marriage are theological issues, not political… We redefine family and look to government as the lone savior – and here we sit.

Baby Boomers moved from biblical values to “do your own thing” which included raising their kids to enjoy a lazy Sunday morning instead of church.

We now raise our kids on the sporting fields while shoe polishing our SUVs each weekend with “Go Team! On to the ‘ships!” instead of teaching the difference between eternal rewards and plastic trophies.

All valid points.  So, now what?

Roxanne Wieman at Relevant Magazine has some great ideas:

We do not rest our hopes for change on a political party or candidate…. in January when Obama takes office, we get up and we continue our sojourn to follow Jesus. We live our votes for life, for justice, for peace, for equality.

We comfort our friend who tells us she’s considering abortion. Then we gently tell her why we believe life in the womb is precious. We help her find alternative options … and we stick by her side all through the pregnancy and birth and after. She is not a statistic or a faceless evil to us.

We love beyond racial, gender and sexual lines. We reject stereotypes. We embrace individuals. We work for reconciliation.

We do not talk about “that side of town,” we live there and work there and mentor there. We are a part of educational reform, and ESL, and rehabilitation.

We recycle. We reduce our imprint. We consciously make our purchases, recognizing the global implications. We strive to “live simply that others may simply live” (Ghandi).

We personally pray for our soldiers in Iraq, for the citizens of Iraq, for our leaders who are making tough decisions that affect millions of lives. We really do pray, and we believe our prayers matter.

We continue to work hard in the jobs God has given us, saving our money and stewarding our resources. We tithe. We donate. We volunteer.

We continually challenge each other to deepen our understanding of whole life ethics and Jesus’ call to follow Him.

Rather than sitting around and “grieving” the election results like James Dobson, it’s time we stop blaming the government, look in the mirror and heed the words of Jesus:

Mark 12:30-31 “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength. The second is this: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no commandment greater than these.”

John 13:34-35 “A new command I give you: Love one another. As I have loved you, so you must love one another. 35By this all men will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.”

If you really want to make a difference in the issues that plague our society, that’s where we start. It’s time to stop going to church and time to start being the church.